Rotary Youth logos changing – watch this space

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About a year ago, Rotary carried out a survey with a simple question: How can we bring our youth program logos closer to Rotary and align them with our new visual guidelines? From the responses, it was made clear that any change should include Rotary, be consistent with our voice and visual identity, and express the history of these programs even as we engage future participants:

  • 74% of you prefer a Rotaract design because it includes the Rotary wheel
  • 75% prefer an Interact design because it includes the Rotary wheel
  • 77% want a stronger connection between Youth Exchange and Rotary
  • 82% want a stronger connection between RYLA and Rotary

As you know, these programs have made a positive difference in our world for decades. We’ve developed leaders through RYLA, built international understanding through Rotary Youth Exchange, and worked side-by-side with Interactors and Rotaractors to take action in our communities. But, just like Rotary, these programs have never received the recognition they deserve. Members of the public often don’t know our programs, why they matter, and how they are connected to Rotary’s story.

In the coming days, we will be rolling out a new visual identity for these programs that helps make that connection to Rotary more clear. Now when we continue to tell our inspiring story of the great work these young leaders make in communities around the world, they will know it is an extension of the Rotary brand. This new visual identity won’t replace your memories — the framed RYLA certificate on your wall, the well-loved Interact T-shirts in your drawer, or the many Youth Exchange pins on your blazer. It won’t erase your fondness for your Rotaract lapel pin or traditional club banner. Instead, we hope our effort builds on those positive feelings and gives you new ways to share your Rotary story with even more young leaders worldwide.

After all, there is no better Rotary brand than youth. You are Rotary’s values in action. You are our voice. And together we can share your Rotary experience with even more leaders.

Learn more about how these visual changes to our programs will strengthen Rotary’s image in our voice and visual identity guidelines.

Rotary Public Image Blog – promoting the good work Rotary does in the community and internationally.

Share your project on Rotary Showcase

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

Rotary Exchange Students help Rotary members in Minnesota pack school materials for a nonprofit in Guatemala. Rotary Youth Exchange Students help Rotary members in Minnesota pack school materials for a nonprofit in Guatemala.

By Rotary Voices staff

Rotary clubs in Minnesota, USA, have banded together to send boxes of textbooks to and purchase school supplies for an organization in Guatemala that is helping students from poor families receive an education.

In 2014, the step-daughter of James Benshoof, a member of the Rotary Club of Crystal, New Hope, Robbinsdale, decided to donate dozens of textbooks to Common Hope, a nonprofit based in St. Paul that works to provide educational opportunities, health care, and housing assistance to families outside Antigua

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Rotary Peace Fellows are the connectors that build peace

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

150313_wendyBy Wendy Coulson, Rotary Peace Center at Chulalongkorn University, Class of 2015

We talked a lot during our first two weeks at the Rotary Peace Center at Chulalongkorn University about connectors and dividers — what brings people or groups together and what drives them apart — in conflict situations.

As soon as our class of Rotary Peace Fellows arrived, we looked for ways to connect with each other. In fact, our tallest classmate found many of us on Facebook and began friendships and organizing workshops even before we arrived. We were so keen to meet each other that we threw open our doors to see who had arrived and threw open our arms to greet those we had only known virtually.

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What is your image of Rotary?

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

150209_burrellBy Evan Burrell, a member of the Rotary Club of Turramurra, New South Wales, Australia, and a regular contributor to this blog

If you are a member of Rotary, you probably already know that it’s one of the largest and oldest service organizations, that we try to attract good people and equip them to be even better, and that we are all about doing good works in our local communities. But what does the general public think about Rotary?

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Why we need to share Rotary’s good news

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

Nisha Kotecha Nisha Kotecha

By Nisha Kotecha, president of the Rotaract Club of Hampstead, Hendon and Golders Green, England

I know a Rotary Club that has changed the lives of hundreds, if not thousands, of young people over the years. I know this because I have attended some of their meetings. And because I am one of the lives they have changed.

The Rotary club I am referring to is one of the largest in London, so they don’t need to generate publicity around their activities. Or do they?

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Why telling Rotary’s story is so important

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

Rotary Director-elect Jennifer E. Jones talks about the importance of Rotary's brand. Rotary Director-elect Jennifer E. Jones talks about the importance of Rotary’s brand. Photo by Alyce Henson/Rotary International

By Ryan Hyland, Rotary editorial staff

More than a year ago, Rotary leaders launched the Strengthening Rotary initiative to enhance and simplify the organization’s story, visual identity, and digital experience. While Rotary’s recognition on the global scale is strong, our image can still use strengthening in local communities.

Speakers at Rotary’s annual training event for leaders in San Diego, California, USA, this week challenged incoming district governors to champion Rotary’s brand in their districts and make sure that their clubs support the effort to tell Rotary’s story in a clear and compelling way. Here’s what a few incoming governors had to say about the initiative:

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Sesame Street health crusader visits Rotary leaders

Originally posted on Rotary Voices:

Past RI President Bill Boyd and Raya Past RI President Bill Boyd and Raya. Photo by Alyce Henson/Rotary International

By Ryan Hyland, Rotary editorial staff

Rotary leaders received a surprise visit Monday from Raya, one of Sesame Street’s newest puppets, during their annual training exercise in San Diego.

Raya joined past RI President Bill Boyd on stage during the third general session of the 2015 International Assembly, joking about how cool Rotary’s emblem looked and chatting with Boyd about toilets.

Sesame Workshop introduced Raya last year with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to teach the TV show’s millions of young viewers in Bangladesh, India, and Nigeria about sanitation and hygiene.

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